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Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral
Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral
Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral
Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral
Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral
Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral
Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral

Antique French Eglomise BonBon Box, Petit Chocolatier's Casket, Notre Dame Cathedral

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There she is, Our Lady (Notre Dame, Paris). I've been inside for the last time in my life, just a couple of days before the fire last April. And back from the South of France to mourn her the day after the fire. But here, you see the famed Paris icon as a Grand Tour tourist would have c. 1850-70, Napoleon III era, Victorian era. This would have been a souvenir box filled with bonbons (chocolatier's confections) and with the intention of leaving a souvenir once the delicate confections were gone. You see that it retains the maker's paper label. These are typically, and in this case, boxes made of card, paper, brass. They're light in weight but for the back-painted glass panel. Such a wonderful depiction here, with carriage and people so tiny, it's amazing the detail captured by the artist. A very old one, at 2 3/8" diameter, those figures are only millimeters tall. Preserved so beautifully! 

Very good to excellent condition throughout, for age and type. There are no losses nor damage to the back-painted glass panel (eglomise), and the brass edging on card has retained it's form and strength, and the box it borders. Measurements in full on the photos and lots of views. The Notre Dame views are more and more coveted. Keep in mind, this was likely just after she was "saved" by Victor Hugo's 1831 novel, "Hunchback of Notre Dame", but did you know that it was his friend, architect Eugéne Viollet-le-Duc** who encouraged Hugo to write it with that hope in mind? After the Napoleonic Wars, it was so badly neglected, it was slated for destruction. Viollet-le-Duc was the one who added the spire that fell so recently in the flames. She changes, she stays the same. May they save her again! 

** You'll love researching all of the French architectural icons that connect to this illustrious deconstructionist, from one end of France to the other. Fascinating!